Reluctant readers getting excited about reading

Books for 8 year olds.We’ve started all the readers in our study with books that are easier for them to read than they are currently reading at school and from what parents are telling us, that approach is really working. In addition to books that are easy to read, the size of the text (quite large) is important, as is the addition of pictures.

One Mum, whose 8 year old daughter is on our study, asked why her daughter  liked the Puddle Lane books so much and she replied that it was because she liked the pictures. The pictures in the Puddle Lane books are, perhaps, unusual in that they are in colour and there are lots of them. Children just starting to read alone still rely quite a lot on pictures to help them to understand and visualise the story, so we always try to suggest books with them in. For details of the books we are using on our study, see our previous post.

Some of the children and parents have found that it was just a matter of finding a few easy to read books and that that has been enough to spark their child’s enthusiasm for reading alone. Where this is the case, it is important to keep them on that same reading level for quite a while so that their enthusiasm is maintained, finding lots of good books at that level. We tend to find that the child moves themselves on gradually when they are ready for something more difficult.

If you are following our study and trying it for yourselves at home, your child will be reading to you for 15 minutes a day. Even if they seem to be coping with a book and seem keen to take it off to read for themselves, it is still important that you have the child reading to you so that you can see whether they are reading it correctly and afterwards just briefly check whether they understand what they have just read, by asking something like “So, why did Tom go off to the park then?” Don’t make a big deal of it, but if they don’t understand what they have just read, they won’t enjoy reading for themselves. A lack of comprehension may indicate that the book is still too difficult for them, at which point it might be a good idea to find something easier.

Just occasionally children get so stewed up about reading out loud, that they cannot concentrate on the story. If you suspect this is the case 1) get your child to read to you to ensure they can actually read the words 2) let them read a page or two to themselves and then check they have understood the story. If they do understand, then you can probably let them read alone straightaway.

Picture by GraceFamily at Flickr

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